London’s History Of Mapping

On a past trip to Manchester, I encountered maps drawn by community members in the Manchester Art Gallery. Photo credit to Mimi Onuoha.

Every weekend, Londoners stream out of their homes and visit the city’s many markets: long stretches of street (off-limits to cars) teeming with stalls of all types of delicious food, trendy clothes, and quirky trinkets. This past weekend, while strolling through one of these markets, I happened upon a booth selling some lovely prints of old London maps.

My project for the Fulbright National Geographic Fellowship involves mapping the digital data of groups of Londoner’s relationships, so my excitement at seeing the prints came as no surprise. And of course, I’m not the only one who cares about maps. They’re generally beloved both as visual objects and communicators of spatial details, and though I’ve given a twist to their original function by using them to convey less obvious information, I still have lots of appreciation for their conventional offerings.

On a past trip to Manchester, I encountered maps drawn by community members in the Manchester Art Gallery. Photo credit to Mimi Onuoha.

But my excitement sprang from the fact that bumping into map prints during a casual weekend walk reminded me of just how fortuitous it is to be here in the UK working on my project. The word “fortuitous” implies that —> Read More Here

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