Opportunity drives on in no-flash mode

Pasadena CA (JPL) Dec 20, 2014

Opportunity is on the west rim of Endeavour Crater heading towards ‘Marathon Valley,’ a location assumed to have abundant clay minerals only about a half-mile (800 meters) to the south.

With the continuing Flash memory problems on the rover, the project has chosen to operate the rover without using the non-volatile Flash storage system and instead rely on the volatile random access memory —> Read More Here

Family criticizing your weight? You might add more pounds

Women whose loved ones are critical of their weight tend to put on even more pounds, says a new study on the way people’s comments affect our health. “When we feel bad about our bodies, we often turn to loved ones — families, friends and romantic partners — for support and advice. How they respond can have a bigger effect than we might think,” said one author. —> Read More Here

Technophobia may keep seniors from using apps to manage diabetes

Despite showing interest in web or mobile apps to help manage their type 2 diabetes, only a small number of older adults actually use them, says a new study. Approximately 2.2 million Canadians are living with type 2 diabetes, 2 million of whom are age 50 or older. A study found that although more than 90 per cent of research participants owned a computer or had daily Internet access, just 18 per cent used applications on this technology to help manage their diabetes. While almost half owned smartphones, only 5 per cent used them to manage their disease. —> Read More Here

Reducing emergency surgery cuts health care costs

Researchers have determined the hospital costs and risk of death for emergency surgery and compared it to the same operation when performed in a planned, elective manner for three common surgical procedures: abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, coronary artery bypass graft and colon resection. The research indicates that reducing emergency surgery for three common procedures by 10 percent could cut $1 billion in health care costs over 10 years. —> Read More Here

Early exposure to antidepressants affects adult anxiety, serotonin transmission

Early developmental exposure to two different antidepressants, Prozac and Lexapro, has been studied by researchers in a mouse model that mimics human third trimester medication exposure. They found that, although these serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting antidepressants were thought to work the same way, they did not produce the same long-term changes in anxiety behavior in the adult mice. About 15 percent of women in the United States suffer from anxiety disorders and depression during their pregnancies, and many are prescribed antidepressants. —> Read More Here

Zero Invasive Predators

This week past the NEXT Foundation of New Zealand made the major announcement of start-up funding for a company named ZIP. Zero Invasive Predators (ZIP) aims to regenerate our native birdlife by transforming the way invasive predators are managed on mainland New Zealand. On small islands (in the range of 10,000 hectares) we have the amazing ability, and luxury, to be able to remove all of an invasive predator species using targeted eradication methodologies, and then manage reinvasion at near-zero leveraging the strong deterrent of surrounding waters acting as a barrier. On the ‘mainland’, or equivalently very large islands, this is not possible, and true eradication of predators has never been possible as they rapidly re-invade from nearby connected areas in a sort of ‘vacuum effect‘ from the gap left by their predecessors. The ZIP company is an exciting step-forward for conservation in New Zealand, because it will be able to combine many different lines of already active research and development and enhance their overall impacts.

In the media this week also is a report in The New Yorker entitled “The Big Kill” describing —> Read More Here

1 2 3 1,033