70 Years After Hiroshima, Disarmament Is Still Vital

Co-authored by Ken Olum, research professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, Tufts University.

A little over 70 years ago, our father, Paul Olum, stood with his colleagues in the desert near Alamogordo, New Mexico. They had spent the last two and a half years designing a new weapon, the first atomic bomb, and now they waited to see whether it would work. Then the explosion seemed to fill the sky, until it resolved into a huge mushroom-shaped cloud. The project had succeeded. They had designed and built the most powerful weapon ever seen on Earth.

Three weeks later, on August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, and, three days after that, another bomb on Nagasaki. The two bombs together killed over 100,000 people instantly, and a similar number died later from radiation exposure. Paul had mixed feelings about the bombing of Hiroshima. It seemed clear it would end the war swiftly, but there had been a very high cost in civilian lives. However, he felt the bombing of Nagasaki was unconscionable, because three days had not been long enough for the surrender.

Six days after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan did announce its surrender. World War II was over, but the nuclear arms race had begun, and Paul Olum became a lifelong advocate of nuclear arms control and disarmament.

By the 1980s, the United States and the Soviet Union together had amassed about 27,000 “active” strategic nuclear bombs each hugely more powerful than those that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The arsenals of either nation were sufficient to destroy humanity many times over.

Paul had been only 24 years old when he and our mother Vivian went to Los Alamos in 1943. After the war was over, he went on to a distinguished career as —> Read More

NASA’s Latest Image Of The International Space Station Is Breathtaking

I spy with my little eye…

Continuing an epic summer of celestial photography, NASA released a stunning image of the International Space Station on Sunday. The shot, captured by agency photographer Bill Ingalls, shows the ISS flying across the face of the moon at a breakneck five miles per second.

There are currently six crew members on board the ISS, which orbits some 300 miles above Earth. The moon, meanwhile, is 238,900 miles away.

Ingalls has served as the senior contract photographer for the U.S. space agency for 27 years. You can see more of his stunning work on his personal website.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

—> Read More

1 2 3 3,607