How Exercise Changes Our DNA – NYTimes.com

We all know that exercise can make us fitter and reduce our risk for illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. But just how, from start to finish, a run or a bike ride might translate into a healthier life has remained baffling.

Now new research reports that the answer may lie, in part, in our DNA. Exercise, a new study finds, changes the shape and functioning of our genes, an important stop on the way to improved health and fitness. —> Read More Here

Why Love And Hate Are So Closely Connected

University Of Chicago behavioral science professor Nicholas Epley joined HuffPost Live host Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani today to explain just how interconnected love and hate are within the brain.

“Hate often comes and can be triggered by an actual experience of love,” said Epley. “When you feel most hate toward somebody else or some ‘out’ group, it’s typically when your ‘in’ group is feeling really threatened. So people are willing to die, to put their lives on the line, to try to save the life of somebody who’s part of their ‘in’ group. It’s really a tight brotherhood with others that seems to inspire the most hatred for others.”

To hear more about how love and hatred connect in the mind, watch the full HuffPost Live clip in the video above. —> Read More Here

Researchers Think They Have Found A Way To Help Close The Achievement Gap

Growing up poor can affect a child’s behavior and school performance. Research has found that the brains of students from poverty-stricken environments can even function differently than those of their more affluent peers, due to developments that inhibit the poorer children’s ability to problem-solve and pay attention.

However, a group of researchers from the University of Texas at Dallas think they have found a way to counteract some of these issues, helping bring low-income adolescents up to speed with their more affluent peers.

A research team led by Dr. Jacquelyn Gamino worked with a group of over 900 middle school-aged adolescents from various socioeconomic backgrounds in the Dallas area to try and determine the impact of a specific learning intervention on these students. The students were split into two groups: students who participated in the cognitive intervention program and those who did not.

Students who received the cognitive intervention designed by the University of Texas at Dallas’ Center for BrainHealth completed 10 different 45-minute sessions in the course of a month. During these sessions, students completed group interactive exercises and written activities, with the aim of teaching them how to extract main ideas from text and analyze —> Read More Here

13 Totes Adorbs Gifts For Your Internet-Obsessed Frenz

If you’re struggling with what to get your Reddit-obsessed friends for the holidays this year, maybe it’s time to admit who you are and go all in on Internet jokes.

You don’t even need to create your own. Many of the Internet memes you already love have been transformed into everything from clothing to gadgets, thanks to the creative types at Etsy and Zazzle.

Don’t be embarrassed to go full-on nerd with your more casual friends either. Memes were everywhere this year. Even your mom and dad surely remember #AlexFromTarget and Pharrell’s hat?

—> Read More Here

Origin of long-standing space mystery revealed: Origin of the ‘theta aurora’

Scientists have solved a long-standing space mystery – the origin of the ‘theta aurora’. Auroras are the most visible manifestation of the Sun’s effect on Earth. They are seen as colorful displays in the night sky, known as the Northern or Southern Lights. They are caused by the solar wind, a stream of plasma – electrically charged atomic particles – carrying its own magnetic field, interacting with the earth’s magnetic field. Normally, the main region for this impressive display is the ‘auroral oval’, which lies at around 65-70 degrees north or south of the equator, encircling the polar caps. However, auroras can occur at even higher latitudes. One type is known as a ‘theta aurora’ because seen from above it looks like the Greek letter theta – an oval with a line crossing through the center. —> Read More Here

In one aspect of vision, computers catch up to primate brain

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects, which the human brain does very accurately and quickly. Until now, no computer model has been able to match the primate brain at visual object recognition during a brief glance. Now neuroscientists have found that one of the latest generation of ‘deep neural networks’ matches the primate brain. —> Read More Here

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