New breast cancer test links immune ‘hotspots’ to better survival

Scientists have developed a new test which can predict the survival chances of women with breast cancer by analyzing images of ‘hotspots’ where there has been a fierce immune reaction to a tumor. Researchers used statistical software previously used in criminology studies of crime hotspots to track the extent to which the immune system was homing in and attacking breast cancer cells. —> Read More Here

A study relates the level of pollutants accumulated in the body with obesity levels

A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. —> Read More Here

Sorry, Ebooks. These 9 Studies Show Why Print Is Better

Don’t lament the lost days of cutting your fingers on pristine new novels or catching a whiff of that magical, transportive old book smell just yet! A slew of recent studies shows that print books are still popular, even among millennials. What’s more: further research suggests that this trend may save demonstrably successful learning habits from certain death. Take comfort in these 9 studies that show that print books have a promising future:

Younger people are more likely to believe that there’s useful information that’s only available offline.
While 62 percent of citizens under 30 subscribe to this belief, only 53 percent of those 30 and older agree. These findings are from a promising study released last year by Pew Research, which also found that millennials are more likely to visit their local library.

Students are more likely to buy physical textbooks.
A study conducted by Student Monitor and featured in The Washington Post shows that 87 percent of textbook spending for the fall 2014 semester was on print books. Of course, this could be due to professors assigning less ebooks. Which is why it’s fascinating that…

Students opt for physical copies of humanities books, even when digital —> Read More Here

Scientists Create Music For Cats, And Fur A Good Reason

“Cats are not humans and humans are not cats and it is important that we humans, as the servants of cats, be aware of this difference.”

That’s Dr. Charles Snowdon, a psychologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He’s been on a quirky mission to–yes, you’re reading this right–create music for cats.

You can listen to some of his “meow-sic” here.

“We were motivated to make music for cats for two reasons,” he told The Huffington Post in an email. “First, many pet owners told us that they play radio music for their pets while they are at work and we wondered if this had any value. Second, we have developed a theory that suggests that species other than humans can enjoy music but that the music has to be in the frequency range that the species uses to communicate and with tempos that they would normally use.”

To create the cat music, Snowdon and his colleagues tried to mimic natural cat sounds, using sliding notes and high pitches–cat calls tend to be an octave or more above human voices. The researchers based the tempo of the songs on purring and suckling sounds.

Then came the moment of truth: —> Read More Here

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