The Facts of Fearbola

When the young woman in the seat next to me asked the flight attendant for a glass of cabernet, I took it as a sign that projectile vomiting and explosive diarrhea would not be part of my trip from PHL to LAX. I also took it as a reminder that the Ebola irrationality I’ve slammed in others is not as foreign to me as I’d like to believe.

I’d been in Philadelphia for a conference on science communication. Scientists, social scientists, doctors, journalists and kindred spirits had come together to examine how facts make their way, or don’t, to policy makers and to the public.

Should there be a tax on carbon to reduce greenhouse gases? How should we handle the conflict between parents who don’t want their kids vaccinated, and the public good of herd immunity? If you think that the quality of decisions like those depends on getting the most knowledge to the most people, then you believe what most scientists believe: it’s called the “knowledge deficit” model. Explain to people that 97 percent of scientists agree that humans cause global warming, and they’ll realize that the jury on climate change is not still out. Properly present the —> Read More Here

The Facts of Fearbola

When the young woman in the seat next to me asked the flight attendant for a glass of cabernet, I took it as a sign that projectile vomiting and explosive diarrhea would not be part of my trip from PHL to LAX. I also took it as a reminder that the Ebola irrationality I’ve slammed in others is not as foreign to me as I’d like to believe.

I’d been in Philadelphia for a conference on science communication. Scientists, social scientists, doctors, journalists and kindred spirits had come together to examine how facts make their way, or don’t, to policy makers and to the public.

Should there be a tax on carbon to reduce greenhouse gases? How should we handle the conflict between parents who don’t want their kids vaccinated, and the public good of herd immunity? If you think that the quality of decisions like those depends on getting the most knowledge to the most people, then you believe what most scientists believe: it’s called the “knowledge deficit” model. Explain to people that 97 percent of scientists agree that humans cause global warming, and they’ll realize that the jury on climate change is not still out. Properly present the —> Read More Here

These 11 Photos Capture The Strength Of Ebola Survivors

the survivors john moore

The Ebola epidemic has claimed over 2,400 lives in Liberia alone, a harrowing number that accounts for more than half of the outbreak’s total death toll according to the CDC. The New England Journal of Medicine estimates the current outbreak has a 70 percent mortality rate — but what of the 30 percent who survive?

Getty Images photographer John Moore visited treatment centers in Liberia to document Ebola survivors and their stories, giving names and faces to the horrifying epidemic. The series is a powerful testament to both the strength of the survivors, and the fact that their troubles don’t necessarily end once they’ve recovered.

Mohammed Bah, a survivor, stands in a Doctors Without Borders treatment center.

“I’ve been rejected by everyone. I’m alone with my two children,” survivor Mohammed Bah told Moore. Despite his clean bill of health — Ebola survivors in Liberia are issued an actual certificate confirming their recovery – his community has refused to accept him back.

But survivors of Ebola may actually be key to fighting future outbreaks, not vessels for further spread. They are believed to be immune to the strain of the virus that first infected them, meaning —> Read More Here

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