Behavioral interventions to prevent progression to diabetes equally effective in men and women

Behavioral and drug interventions aiming to prevent people with prediabetes progressing to full blown type 2 diabetes are equally effective for both sexes at preventing progression and reducing weight, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis. The research is by Dr. Anna Glechner, Danube University Krems, Austria, and Dr. Jürgen Harreiter, Medical University of Vienna, Austria, and colleagues. —> Read More Here

Flying Robots Serving in Singapore by 2015

Customers-looking-at-Tray

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels.

Customers looking at a flying tray. Photo © Infinium Robotics

Can you imagine going to a restaurant and being served by a flying robot? Reality might surpass your imagination if you travel to Singapore by the end of next year.

Infinitum-Serve, the company behind the autonomous flying robotic waiters, specializes in providing autonomous robotic solutions for commercial applications across various industries. The futuristic flying robotic waiters will be first launched at one of Timbre Group’s five outlets in Singapore in late 2015.

“Introducing this technology into restaurants would take away mundane tasks of serving food and drinks,” said Infinium Robotics CEO Woon Junyang to several media outlets. “It will allow human waiters to focus on higher-value tasks such as getting feedback from customers,” he said.

A welcome-to-the future type of demo showcasing Infinium-Serve in action was presented to Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the launch of the National Productivity Month in October.

“This will —> Read More Here

Astronomers Poised to Capture Image of Supermassive Milky Way Black Hole

This artist's conception illustrates one of the most primitive supermassive black holes known (central black dot) at the core of a young, star-rich galaxy. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Artist’s concept of one of the most primitive supermassive black holes (central black dot) at the core of a young, star-rich galaxy. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Scientists have long suspected that supermassive black holes (SMBH) reside at the center of every large galaxy in our universe. These can be billions of times more massive than our sun, and are so powerful that activity at their boundaries can ripple throughout their host galaxies.

In the case of the Milky Way galaxy, this SMBH is believed to correspond with the location of a complex radio source known as Sagittarius A*. Like all black holes, no one has even been able to confirm that they exist, simply because no one has ever been able to observe one.

But thanks to researchers working out of MIT’s Haystack Observatory, that may be about to change. Using a new telescope array known as the “Event Horizon Telescope” (EHT), the MIT team hopes to produce this “image of the century” very soon.(…)
Read the rest of Astronomers Poised to Capture Image of Supermassive Milky Way Black Hole (665 words)


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Survival differences seen for advanced-stage laryngeal cancer

The five-year survival rate for advanced-stage laryngeal cancer was higher than national levels in a small study at a single academic center performing a high rate of surgical therapy, including a total laryngectomy, or removal of the voice box, to treat the disease, despite a national trend toward organ preservation, according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. —> Read More Here

NASA’s Van Allen Probes Spot Impenetrable Radiation Barrier in Space

Visualization of the radiation belts with confined charged particles (blue & yellow) and plasmapause boundary (blue-green surface). Image Credit:  NASA/Goddard

Visualization of the radiation belts with confined charged particles (blue & yellow) and plasmapause boundary (blue-green surface). Credit: NASA/Goddard

It’s a well-known fact that Earth’s ozone layer protects us from a great deal of the Sun’s ultra-violet radiation. Were it not for this protective barrier around our planet, chances are our surface would be similar to the rugged and lifeless landscape we observe on Mars.

Beyond this barrier lies another – a series of shields formed by a layer of energetic charged particles that are held in place by the Earth’s magnetic field. Known as the Van Allen radiation belts, this wall prevents the fastest, most energetic electrons from reaching Earth.

And according to new research from NASA’s Van Allen probes, it now appears that these belts may be nearly impenetrable, a finding which could have serious implications for future space exploration and research.(…)
Read the rest of NASA’s Van Allen Probes Spot Impenetrable Radiation Barrier in Space (942 words)


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