NASA’s First Orion Crew Module Arrives Safely back at Kennedy Space Center

Homecoming view of NASA's first Orion spacecraft after returning to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 19, 2014 after successful blastoff on Dec. 5, 2014.  Credit: Ken Kremer - kenkremer.com

Homecoming view of NASA’s first Orion spacecraft after returning to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 19, 2014 after successful blastoff on Dec. 5, 2014. Credit: Ken Kremer – kenkremer.com

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL – After a history making journey of more than 60,000 miles through space, ocean splash down and over 2000 mile cross country journey through the back woods of America, NASA’s pathfinding Orion crew capsule has returned to its home base at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

“The Orion mission was a spectacular success,” said Jules Schneider, Lockheed Martin Program manager for Orion at KSC, during a homecoming event attended by space journalists including Universe Today on Friday, Dec. 19, 2014. (…)
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How To Watch The Ursid Meteor Shower, The Last Shooting Star Bonanza Of 2014

Skywatchers will have another shot at seeing shooting stars in 2014, thanks to the Ursid meteor shower.

The Ursid shower, which seems to originate in the constellation Ursa Minor, has been active since Wednesday and is expected to peak overnight on Monday, Dec. 22 through Tuesday, Dec. 23.

The best viewing hours for skywatchers in the Northern Hemisphere are between midnight and dawn local time.

Ursid meteors active around December solstice
http://t.co/AeP6f0KXUd pic.twitter.com/kusyKxGK45

— EarthSky (@earthskyscience) December 19, 2014

The Ursids won’t be quite as spectacular as the Geminid shower that came earlier this month. But the show should be worth watching, with as many as 10 to 15 meteors per hour anticipated at the shower’s peak.

No special equipment is needed to see the meteors. Just bundle up, and find a suitable location from which to watch.

“Get to a dark spot, get comfortable, bring extra blankets to stay warm, and let your eyes adjust to the dark sky,” NASA recommends. “A cozy lounge chair makes for a great seat, as does simply lying on your back on a blanket, eyes scanning the whole sky.”

The Ursid —> Read More Here

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