Lizards can stomach island living

Life on an island isn’t always easy. To make the most of the little there is to eat on many Greek islands, the digestive system of Balkan green lizards has evolved considerably compared to family members on the mainland. Surprisingly, many of these insect-eating lizards even have special valves that help to digest plants. —> Read More

Prasugrel associated with increased major bleeding in high-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease

Prasugrel-based dual antiplatelet therapy is associated with increased major bleeding after stent implantation for high-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease, according to a secondary analysis of the BASKET-PROVE II trial. Major bleedings were more pronounced in elderly and low-weight patients and raise concerns about the safety of prescriptions in these patients. —> Read More

The Menu From The Titanic’s Last Lunch Is Going Up For Auction

NEW YORK (AP) — The Titanic’s last lunch menu — saved by a passenger who climbed aboard the so-called “Money Boat” before the ocean liner went down — is going to auction, where it’s estimated it will bring $50,000 to $70,000.

The online New York auctioneer Lion Heart Autographs is offering the menu and two other previously unknown artifacts from Lifeboat 1 on Sept. 30. The auction marks the 30th anniversary of the wreckage’s discovery at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

Abraham Lincoln Salomon was one of a handful of first-class passengers who boarded the lifeboat — dubbed the “Money Boat” or “Millionaire’s Boat” by the press because of unfounded rumors one of them bribed seven crew members to quickly row the boat away from the sinking ship rather than rescue others.

The menu, which listed corned beef, dumplings and other savory items, is signed on the back in pencil by another first-class passenger, Isaac Gerald Frauenthal, who escaped on another lifeboat. It’s believed the two men lunched together that fateful day in 1912.

Salomon also took away a printed ticket from the Titanic’s opulent Turkish baths, which recorded a person’s weight when seated in a specially designed upholstered lounge chair. It bears the names of three of the five other first-class passengers with him on Lifeboat 1. One of four weighing-chair tickets known to exist, it’s estimated it will bring $7,500 to $10,000.

The third artifact is a letter written by Mabel Francatelli to Salomon on New York’s Plaza Hotel stationery six months after the disaster. She had climbed into the No. 1 lifeboat with her employer, aristocratic fashion designer Lucy Duff-Gordon and her Scottish husband Lord Cosmo Duff-Gordon, who it was alleged bribed the crew to row them to safety in the boat that had a capacity of 40.

The Duff-Gordons, who —> Read More

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