Heavy Metal Frost On Venus

Boulder CO (SPX) Oct 21, 2014

Venus is hiding something beneath its brilliant shroud of clouds: a first order mystery about the planet that researchers may be a little closer to solving because of a new re-analysis of twenty-year-old spacecraft data.

Venus’s surface can’t be seen from orbit in visible light because of the planet’s hot, dense, cloudy atmosphere. Instead, radar has been used by spacecraft to penetrate th —> Read More Here

Descent Data May Help With Future Mars Landings

Washington DC (SPX) Oct 21, 2014

NASA successfully captured thermal images of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on its descent after it launched in September from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The data from these thermal images may provide critical engineering information for future missions to the surface of Mars.

“Because the technologies required to land large payloads on Mars are significantly different than tho —> Read More Here

Argentina launches its first telecom satellite

Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 21, 2014

Argentina has successfully launched its first domestically designed and developed geostationary communications satellite Thursday, USA Today reported.

“ARSAT-1 is on its way to space. What a thrill,” Argentina’s President Cristina Kirchner wrote on her Twitter account.

The satellite will occupy the 81 West orbital slot, 36,000 km away from earth.

ARSAT-1 is the first satellite —> Read More Here

A Different Kind of Green Movement: Seedling Growth in Space

Washington DC (SPX) Oct 17, 2014

Plants-literally rooted in Earth-lack locomotion. And although plants may appear static, even the tiniest seedlings are sophisticated organisms that sense and respond to their environment. Seedlings may not travel, but they do move.

An international team of NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) researchers are studying the growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings – also know —> Read More Here

Scientists restore hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies

Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging. —> Read More Here

1 2 3 168