Mars Methane: Life at Last?

Mars is a tease.

It seems that discoveries hinting at life on the Red Planet are as recurrent as Kansas hay fever. Open up the science section of any periodical, and you’ll invariably trip across new research encouraging us to believe that somewhere, skulking in the vast, dry landscapes of that desolate world, are small, wiggling creatures — fellow inhabitants of the solar system.

Such enticing tidbits are nothing new. Their modern incarnation dates back to the early 1900s, when astronomer Percival Lowell promoted the existence of Martians who had trussed their planet with irrigation canals. This idea was well received by the public, but the astronomical community was at first skeptical, and eventually dismissive. By the First World War, these sluice-happy Martians were vaporware.

As the century ground on, additional see-saw arguments for martian life made regular appearances. In the 1970s, the Viking Landers, with the best science instrumentation NASA could launch, went looking for life in the martian dirt. The verdict was that they didn’t find any. But one member of the Viking biology team doesn’t agree. Was it a hit or a whiff? We still can’t say for —> Read More Here

Chicken Soup Really Is ‘Jewish Penicillin’ For Your Cold. Mom Was Right.

If you were brought up by a Jewish mother, chances are you have been prescribed a hot bowl of chicken soup at a time you felt under the weather. Dr. Mom may have insisted it was a type of “Jewish penicillin,” that it would lessen your sniffles and perk you right up. She was, in some regard, correct.

In a 2000 study published in the journal of the American College of Chest Physicians, researchers found that chicken soup could help reduce upper-respiratory inflammation, which leads to those annoying qualities of a cold, like a stuffy head and incessant sneezing. Many doctors believe that colds are caused by viral infections. The body responds to these infections by sending over white blood cells to take charge, though they are not really effective in killing the virus. Instead, they lead to those cold-like symptoms that make you feel crummy.

Stephen Rennard, M.D, Larson Professor of medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and one of the study’s leaders, found that fewer white blood cells attempted to be heroes when the body had chicken soup in its system. The soup had some “very modest but clearly measurable” —> Read More Here

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