Complete Tiny Dinosaur Skeleton Discovered In South Korea

microraptor

A tiny dinosaur about the size of a house cat was recently discovered in South Korea.

The dinosaur’s fossilized remains span about 11 inches, but scientists told Korea JoongAng Daily that it was likely about 20 inches long when it was alive.

“Based on the findings so far, we assume that the dinosaur is something close to a microraptor or others in the raptor genera,” Lim Jong-deock, chief curator of the National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage, told the news agency. “However, it’s uncertain at this stage exactly which type of dinosaur it was, and there is a chance that it is a new type that hasn’t been reported to academia as of yet.”

(Story continues below image.)

An illustration of a microraptor, which the dinosaur fossil closely resembles.

The tiny dino is a theropod, a family of carnivorous dinosaurs that includes Tyrannosaurus rex. That means it had sharp teeth and claws–only a whole lot smaller. And if it is indeed a microraptor, it would also have had four wings.

The dinosaur lived during the Cretaceous period, which ended some 66 million years ago with the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction event.

The way this dinosaur has been fossilized —> Read More Here

Neil deGrasse Tyson Has Adorable Advice For First-Graders, And Here’s What It Is

What could be cuter than a conversation between Neil deGrasse Tyson and a first-grader?

Earlier this month, the famed astrophysicist called on six-year-old Kaitlynn Goulette to ask him a question while he was delivering a lecture at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass.

When the young girl asked, “How can first-graders help the Earth,” Tyson didn’t tell her to recycle or invest in solar panels. Rather, he encouraged her to not lose her natural curiosity to explore the Earth that she so desperately wants to help. Check out the exchange in the YouTube video above.

“He’s just told this little girl that she too can be a scientist,” YouTube user Tiffany Henry commented on the video. “I am feeling all the joy in the world right now.”

There’s no question that children have an innate enthusiasm for science. Just watch first-and second-graders in this “Talk Nerdy To Me” episode below.

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Beam Me Up, Mars! Uwingu Will Send 90,000 Radio Messages There Today

Early Spring Dust Storms at the North Pole of Mars. Early spring typically brings dust storms to northern polar Mars. As the north polar cap begins to thaw, the temperature difference between the cold frost region and recently thawed surface results in swirling winds. The choppy dust clouds of several dust storms are visible in this mosaic of images taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft in 2002. The white polar cap is frozen carbon dioxide. (NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems)

Early Spring Dust Storms at the North Pole of Mars. Early spring typically brings dust storms to northern polar Mars. As the north polar cap begins to thaw, the temperature difference between the cold frost region and recently thawed surface results in swirling winds. The choppy dust clouds of several dust storms are visible in this mosaic of images taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft in 2002. The white polar cap is frozen carbon dioxide. (NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems)

Maybe you can’t climb on a rocketship to Mars, at least yet, but at the least you can get your desire for exploration out through other means. Today, take comfort that humanity is sending 90,000 messages in the Red Planet’s direction. That’s right, the non-profit Uwingu plans to transmit these missives today around 3 p.m. EST (8 p.m. UTC).

Among the thousands of ordinary folks are a collection of celebrities: Bill Nye, the Science Guy; George Takei (“Sulu” on Star Trek) and commercial astronaut Richard Garriott, among many others.

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Pop music heritage contributes to the formation of identity

The musical rebels of the past are today’s museum pieces. Pop music is increasingly penetrating heritage institutions such as museums and archives. That is apparent from the PhD research of Arno van der Hoeven. On Thursday 27 November 2014 he defended his thesis entitled ‘Popular Music Memories. Places and practices of popular music heritage, memory and cultural identity’ at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In his research, Van der Hoeven also shows that pop music heritage contributes to the formation of people’s identity. —> Read More Here

New age of the Lantian Homo erectus cranium extending to about 1.63 million years ago

According to paper published online November 20 in the Journal of Human Evolution, the age of the Lantian Homo erectus cranium from Gongwangling, Lantian County, Shaanxi Province, China, is likely half a million years older than previously thought. Earlier estimates dated this important fossil, which was found in 1964, to 1.15 million years ago. A research team of Chinese and British scientists, have provided compelling evidence that the fossil should be dated to 1.63 million years ago, making it the oldest fossil hominin cranium known in northeast Asia, and the second oldest site with cranial remains outside Africa. Only the Dmanisi crania from Georgia that, like Lantian, are relatively small-brained, are older, at around 1.75 million years old. —> Read More Here

Rocket Remains? Video Shows ‘Pieces Of Whatever’ Flaming High Above Belgrade

Just before dawn on Wednesday (Nov. 26), a pilot in Belgrade caught this stunning video of a “huge number of glowing pieces of whatever” breaking up in the atmosphere above.

You know what this is? A rocket, most likely! It’s the upper stage for the Soyuz that launched three people to space on Sunday (Nov. 23), the European Space Agency says.

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Helping older employees stay in their jobs

Factors that can hinder older employees from continuing to work include workload, a poor memory and the pensionable age-effect. The Job-Exposure Matrix is a newly developed instrument that provides an easy way to chart the workload of older employees. Kelly Rijs investigated how people experience their own health at the end of their career and the influence of the pensionable age on this. Rijs defended her doctoral thesis on 20 November 2014 at the VU Medical Center. —> Read More Here

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