Bowhead Whale Songs Are Complex and Copied, New Study Shows

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Inuit legend says Sedna, the beautiful but tragic goddess of the ocean, sings underwater to give detailed instructions to the whales and other sea animals.

Now scientists have new information about the level of detail in the songs that bowhead whales sing to one another when they are migrating into the Beaufort Sea each spring.

The findings, from sound recordings made in the spring of 2011 by a consortium of scientists from several institutions, are described in a detailed study published online Dec. 30 in the journal Marine Mammal Science.

The researchers documented 12 unique songs sung by at least 32 individual whales while swimming off Point Barrow. It is the greatest number of songs cataloged during the population’s spring migration, possibly a result of the growing population, says the study, a joint project of scientists from Bates College, the University of Washington, the North Slope Borough, Norway’s FRAM-High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment and Cornell University.

From the evidence gathered in the study — the recordings collected during the spring — the scientists are confident that bowhead whales are sharing their complex songs, said study co-author Kate Stafford of the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory.

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Mars Rover Photo Shows ‘Human Shadow,’ Or Maybe It Doesn’t

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From rats to skulls to a disappearing doughnut, so-called “ufologists” claim to have seen all sorts of strange things in photos taken by NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover.

Now they’re saying that a rover photo taken in 2012 (see below) shows the shadow of a human or human-like alien “messing with” the rover.

“The person has no helmet and their short hair is visible and in high detail,” Taiwan-based ufologist Scott Waring wrote in a post on his blog UFO Sightings Daily. “The person has on air tanks on their back and a suit that covers most of the body except the hair.”

Waring goes on to wonder if the image indicates that the rover isn’t on Mars at all but right here on Earth–or that humanoid aliens live on the Red Planet.

Of course, there’s always the (more likely) possibility that the shadow only looks like that of a human form. It makes sense that our brains would interpret the image this way. Humans are wired to spot patterns and even faces in images–it’s a phenomenon called pareidolia.

Here’s the same shadow from a slightly different angle taken about 28 seconds later. Yes, it still —> Read More Here

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