Study finds provider-focused intervention improves HPV vaccination rates

Changing the way doctors practice medicine is difficult, however a new study has shown that combining traditional education with quality improvement and incentives improves Human Papilloma virus vaccination rates in boys and girls. The study, which appears on-line in the journal Vaccine, has the potential to produce sustained improvements in these vaccination rates. —> Read More Here

Pain in a dish

After more than six years of intensive effort, and repeated failures that made the quest at times seem futile, Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology have successfully converted mouse and human skin cells into pain sensing neurons that respond to a number of stimuli that cause acute and inflammatory pain. —> Read More Here

Can stress management help save honeybees?

Honeybee populations are clearly under stress — from the Varroa mite, insecticides, and other factors — but it’s been difficult to pinpoint any one of them as the root cause of devastating losses in honeybee hives. Researchers in a new paper say that the problem likely stems from a complex and poorly understood interplay of stresses and their impact on bee health. It’s a situation they suspect might be improved through stress management and better honeybee nutrition. —> Read More Here

6 Years After Hurricane Ike, Texas Coast Remains Vulnerable

GALVESTON, Texas, Nov 24 (Reuters) – When Hurricane Ike hit this city on the Gulf of Mexico, William Merrell found himself trapped in a second-floor apartment as storm waters coursed eight feet deep through the floor below. “I had time to think,” said the professor and chair of marine sciences at Texas A&M University Galveston.
One thing he thought about was the Dutch Delta Works, a vast coastal protection system he had seen several years earlier on a trip to the Netherlands.
That led to his big idea: build a 60-mile-long, 17-foot-tall dike that would guard against the next hurricane that hits the long, thin barrier island on which Galveston sits. Like its Dutch inspiration, his idea included massive gates that would swing shut as a storm approached, blocking the 1.7-mile-wide entrance to Galveston Bay. The gate would protect low-lying parts of metro Houston, home to hundreds of thousands of people and an oil and petrochemicals —> Read More Here

Feds Warn Against Surgery Device That Can Actually Spread Cancer

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators have strengthened their warning against use of a once-popular device for gynecologic surgery that can spread unsuspected cancer, saying its risk is only justified in a fraction of patients.

The Food and Drug Administration is updating its April safety warning, now saying doctors should not use the devices, called laparoscopic power morcellators, for performing a hysterectomy or removing uterine fibroids “in the vast majority of women.”

The FDA’s Dr. William Maisel says there are safer options for the procedures for most patients — but he said the device may be appropriate for some women.

One manufacturer, Johnson & Johnson, directed surgeons to stop using its device for the procedures in April, when concerns about inadvertently spreading cancer inside women’s abdomens first arose. It’s now conducting a worldwide recall.

—> Read More Here

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