Retro Travel Posters Show Us The Future

Visitors to Jupiter view the Jovian auroras from balloons. Image: NASA/JPL.

One of the greatest things about being a space enthusiast is all of the discoveries that come out on an almost daily basis. One of the saddest things about being a space enthusiast is all of the discoveries and destinations that are so close, just beyond the horizon of our lifespan.Will we colonize other planets? Sure, but most of us living will be gone by then. Will we spend time in glorious, gleaming space habitats? Obviously, but we’ll just be epitaphs by then. Sentient, alien species that gift us faster-than-light travel and other wonders? Maybe, but not before my bucket list has its final item checked off.Citizen space travel? Hmmmm, tantalizingly within reach.But now, new retro style posters from NASA, designed by the team at Invisible Creature, are making us feel nostalgic about things that haven’t even happened yet, and are helping us leave behind gloomy thoughts of being born at the wrong time.The Grand Tour celebrates a time when our probes toured the planets, using gravity assist to propel them on their missions.

“Grandpa, do you remember the Grand Tour, when spacecraft used gravity assist to visit other worlds?””I sure do. Gravity assist. Those were the days. Swooping so close to Jupiter, you could feel the radiation killing your hair follicles. Only to be sling-shotted on to the next planet.””But why didn’t you just use a quantum drive to bend space time and appear at your destination?””Quantum drives! Those things ain’t natural. And neither is bending space-time. Give me a good old-fashioned chemical rocket any time.””Oh Grandpa.”

Visit the Historic Sites of Mars recalls a time when space pioneers colonized and terraformed Mars.

“Grandpa, what was Mars like in the Early Days?””You mean before it was terraformed? Very tough times.””Because conditions were so difficult? And food was hard to grow?””No. Because —> Read More

Weekly Space Hangout – Feb. 12, 2016: Amy Shira Teitel

Host: Fraser Cain (@fcain)

Special Guest: Amy Shira Teitel, Author of “Breaking the Chains of Gravity” that was released in the States on January 12, 2016. Contributing writer for Vintage Space column on Popular Science, and host at Discovery News.

Guests:
Morgan Rehnberg (cosmicchatter.org / @MorganRehnberg )
Jolene Creighton (fromquarkstoquasars.com / @futurism)


Their stories this week:

NASA budget proposal

JWST primary mirror fully assembled

Asteroid Retrieval Mission delayed to 2023 (and probably forever)

LIGO

Man in India killed by meteor (NASA says no…would have been a cool way to go though)

Hidden Galaxies!!

We’ve had an abundance of news stories for the past few months, and not enough time to get to them all. So we’ve started a new system. Instead of adding all of the stories to the spreadsheet each week, we are now using a tool called Trello to submit and vote on stories we would like to see covered each week, and then Fraser will be selecting the stories from there. Here is the link to the Trello WSH page (http://bit.ly/WSHVote), which you can see without logging in. If you’d like to vote, just create a login and help us decide what to cover!

We record the Weekly Space Hangout every Friday at 12:00 pm Pacific / 3:00 pm Eastern. You can watch us live on Google+, Universe Today, or the Universe Today YouTube page.

You can also join in the discussion between episodes over at our Weekly Space Hangout Crew group in G+!

The post Weekly Space Hangout – Feb. 12, 2016: Amy Shira Teitel appeared first on Universe Today.

—> Read More

Two Latinas At Forefront Of Historic Science Discovery

One of the biggest discoveries in science was announced Thursday: the detection of gravitational waves from the collision of two black holes, a discovery that confirms many of Albert Einstein’s theories about the universe.

At the forefront of this exciting discovery are Gabriela González and France A. Córdova.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Gravitational Waves: Why Are Scientists Celebrating?

The entire planet shook on September 14th, 2015. The very fabric of space itself rippled and distorted. Your own body was repeatedly squashed and stretched.

But you can be forgiven for not noticing: the amount of stretching was around one billionth the diameter of an atom.

So what’s all the fuss about? What happened on September 14th, and why has it now got scientists so excited?

In 1915, Albert Einstein published his general theory of relativity, a visionary and revolutionary description of the nature of gravity. General relativity makes a host of bizarre but very specific predictions about how gravity affects matter and light. A huge number of these predictions have been exquisitely confirmed by experiments. So while we still don’t know whether Einstein’s theory is correct (and indeed we strongly suspect that general relativity isn’t the whole story), it seems to be an excellent description of how the Universe works under almost every circumstance we can currently examine.

But there’s always been one glaring gap in the story.

In 1916, Einstein pointed out that under many circumstances, a moving massive object will cause space itself to ripple, a little like the expanding ripples of water produced by a stone skipping over a pond. In particular, if two heavenly bodies are in orbit around each other, then the space around them will be filled with these “gravitational waves“, generated as the two objects bend the space around them with their mass. The waves that result then race away from the orbiting system at the speed of light, carrying away energy and thus causing the two objects to gradually but inexorably spiral in towards each other.

In 1916 this was completely esoteric. The two objects in orbit would have to be incredibly massive, and the size of the expected rippling —> Read More

Gravitational Waves: Why Are Scientists Celebrating?

The entire planet shook on September 14th, 2015. The very fabric of space itself rippled and distorted. Your own body was repeatedly squashed and stretched.

But you can be forgiven for not noticing: the amount of stretching was around one billionth the diameter of an atom.

So what’s all the fuss about? What happened on September 14th, and why has it now got scientists so excited?

In 1915, Albert Einstein published his general theory of relativity, a visionary and revolutionary description of the nature of gravity. General relativity makes a host of bizarre but very specific predictions about how gravity affects matter and light. A huge number of these predictions have been exquisitely confirmed by experiments. So while we still don’t know whether Einstein’s theory is correct (and indeed we strongly suspect that general relativity isn’t the whole story), it seems to be an excellent description of how the Universe works under almost every circumstance we can currently examine.

But there’s always been one glaring gap in the story.

In 1916, Einstein pointed out that under many circumstances, a moving massive object will cause space itself to ripple, a little like the expanding ripples of water produced by a stone skipping over a pond. In particular, if two heavenly bodies are in orbit around each other, then the space around them will be filled with these “gravitational waves“, generated as the two objects bend the space around them with their mass. The waves that result then race away from the orbiting system at the speed of light, carrying away energy and thus causing the two objects to gradually but inexorably spiral in towards each other.

In 1916 this was completely esoteric. The two objects in orbit would have to be incredibly massive, and —> Read More

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