Personalized advertising attracts more attention, makes the contents of ads easier to remember

Personalized advertisements on the Internet not only attract more attention, they also remain in our memory longer than impersonal ads. This is the result of a study conducted by Professor Kai Kaspar from the Psychology Department of the University of Cologne in collaboration with his colleagues Moritz Köster, Marco Rüth and Dr. Kai-Christoph Hamborg in Osnabrück. Specifically, they investigated the gaze behavior of female students on websites. —> Read More Here

New Video Busts 4 Common Myths About Catching Cold In Cold Weather

Does exposure to cold weather really make you more likely to catch a cold?

No, it doesn’t. In fact, as a new YouTube video entitled Cold Weather Myths explains, research suggests just the opposite: frigid temps lower the risk of catching cold by stimulating the body’s production of infection-fighting immune cells known as granulocytes.

And you know how they say being wet in the cold, or failing to bundle up, can make you sick? According to the video, part of the “Healthcare Triage” series, those too are just myths.

The persistence of folk wisdom linking the common cold virus and winter is nothing to sneeze at. According to one survey cited in the 2012 book “Because I Said So!,” 38 percent of Americans believe being out in cold weather can make you sick.

Needless to say, the debate over how we catch colds probably isn’t going to end soon. But whether or not you put on your overcoat, one of the few indisputable facts about the common cold is that many of us will catch one. According to Harvard Medical School, Americans endure a billion colds annually.

Achoo to that! —> Read More Here

Liberation for Samburu Women Begins with a Song

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If a Samburu girl in northern Kenya marries before she has been ‘cut’ (circumcised), tradition dictates that her family must create a small opening in the fence around the village, and the disgraced girl is asked to leave through the hole.

Once she is gone, the opening is patched up, and she is forgotten forever.

In Kenya, female genital cutting (FGC)––the ritual removal of the external parts of a woman’s genitalia––is illegal, yet nearly 100 percent of the women in northern Kenya’s remote Samburu communities are circumcised, often by crude and informal means, when they are young girls.

FGC causes many physical and emotional problems for these women, but the effects of the practice extend way beyond the trauma of the girls who are forced to go under the blade. If they survive the process, once circumcised, sexual intercourse becomes unpleasant for both men and women in the relationship, leading to polygamous marriages. Men often have to travel in search of work, and as a result, the HIV virus is now spreading into the Samburu communities at an alarming rate.

A lyric for change

It is market day in Ngutuk Ongiron, a rural village in the Westgate Samburu community in northern —> Read More Here

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