The quality of parent-infant relationships and early childhood shyness predict teen anxiety

Social anxiety is one of the most common psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents. A new study has found that together, the quality of parent-infant relationships and early childhood shyness predict the likelihood of social anxiety in adolescence. In this longitudinal study, researchers studied 165 European-American, middle- to upper-middle-class adolescents who were recruited as infants. —> Read More Here

Subtle but important memory function affected by preterm birth

A study of children born prematurely has found differences in a subtle but important aspect of memory: the ability to form and retrieve memories about context. The study examined 33 German 8-to 10-year olds using magnetic resonance imaging to measure the volume of the hippocampi. The results suggest that the maturational state of the hippocampus at the time of birth influences the maturation of certain memory functions even at 8- to 10-years old. —> Read More Here

High-dose flu vaccine superior for frail elderly living in long-term care facilities

The high-dose flu vaccine is significantly better than the regular flu shot at boosting the immune response to the flu virus in frail, older residents of long-term care facilities, according to the results of a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine study. It is the first evaluation of the vaccine in long-term care residents, which is the population most vulnerable to flu-related death. —> Read More Here

High-dose flu vaccine appears better for frail older adults in long-term care

For frail older adults living in long-term care facilities, the high-dose influenza vaccine appears to be a better option than the regular shot, producing a stronger immune response than the standard vaccine, according to a study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and now available online. High-dose vaccine may play a key role, along with improving vaccination rates among health care workers and other strategies, in preventing flu in this vulnerable and growing population. —> Read More Here

Fine particulate air pollution linked with increased autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy — particularly during the third trimester — may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a study from Harvard School of Public Health. The greater the exposure, the greater the risk, researchers found. It was the first US-wide study exploring the link between airborne particulate matter and autism. —> Read More Here

Early caregiving experiences have long-term effects on social relationships, achievement

A new study has found that sensitive caregiving in the first three years of life predicts an individual’s social competence and academic achievement, not only during childhood and adolescence, but into adulthood. The study used information from 243 individuals who were born into poverty, came from a range of racial/ethnic backgrounds, and had been followed from birth to age 32 as part of the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaption —> Read More Here

1 2 3 998