92 Percent Of All Restaurant Meals Have Crazy Calorie Counts

You probably don’t expect every meal you eat at a restaurant to contain a large number of calories. Sure, the occasional fast food cheat meal might be excessive, but your local farm-to-table place feeds you well, right?

According to new research from Tufts University, nearly all restaurant meals — whether from a fast food joint or the luxurious confines of a Michelin-reviewed kitchen — contain way too many calories.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, measured 364 restaurant meals from both large chain and local restaurants and a variety of cuisines, finding that 92 percent of them exceed the recommended calorie requirements for a single meal.

What’s more, one third of these meals exceeded the energy requirement for an entire day. And, just as a reminder, the meals didn’t include typical restaurant accompaniments, like drinks, appetizers or dessert.

We need to take control of our plates.

The researchers did not go into why restaurant dishes are so caloric, but it’s not hard to come up with a guess: sugar, fat and salt make things taste better. A chef’s priority is to make food enjoyable, so they use more of the stuff that also makes food more caloric.

What’s more, portion sizes all but guarantee overeating. In a 2015 study from Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab, researchers did not find any correlation between the consumption of junk foods and being overweight. Instead, it is the size of the meals that most contributed to America’s obesity epidemic.

This isn’t a jab at the artful work that restaurant staffers do. It’s a reminded to eat more food at home, and to be mindful of the portion on your plate. You might consider boxing up half of a —> Read More