Africa’s Rangers at the Frontline of the Poaching War

Dogs are playing an ever increasingly important role in the war against poaching and form very close bonds with their ranger handlers.

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world.

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Peter Chadwick

Dogs are playing an ever increasingly important role in the war against poaching and form very close bonds with their ranger handlers.

While the world’s media largely focuses on the rhino and elephant poaching that is taking place on the African continent, little attention is given to the field rangers who are the ones at the frontline of this war against Africa’s iconic wildlife.

Proper and regular training is imperative for ranger teams so that they can tackle well-armed groups of poachers operating with high-caliber weapons.
A large-caliber hunting rifle is placed in a police forensic bag as part of evidence collected during an anti-poaching operation.
A large-caliber hunting rifle is placed in a police forensic bag as part of evidence collected during an anti-poaching operation.

The ranger’s job is often undertaken without recognition and with little understanding of the extent and complexity of the work that they do and the positive impact that these rangers make for conservation. The rangers have to work in remote wilderness areas under arduous conditions, usually where communication is a serious challenge and resource support is extremely scarce. They make enormous sacrifices, regularly placing their lives at risk in ensuring the integrity and conservation of Africa’s protected areas. The work of these conservation heroes is not only about undertaking law enforcement patrols, but they also assist in other important conservation tasks such as game —> Read More

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail