Bats Big and Small in the World’s Oldest Desert

Two desert elephant families convene at water just before sunset on the Hoanib River a few kilometers east of Skeleton Coast National Park, Namibia (Photo by Theresa Laverty)
Two desert elephant families convene at water just before sunset on the Hoanib River a few kilometers east of Skeleton Coast National Park, Namibia. (Photo by Theresa Laverty)

Traveling to a new country is always an eye-opening adventure. Coming to Namibia to try to figure out how insect-eating bats are affected by the dry season has been no exception. Namibia is the world’s second least densely populated country—behind Mongolia—and also one of its newest, only gaining independence from South Africa in 1990.

While it takes time studying a map, navigating Windhoek, the capitol city, felt like a breeze compared to Nairobi, the capitol of Kenya with a human population nearly ten times larger.

I’ve found that it is possible in Namibia to drive all day and hardly see another vehicle on the road, and many of the roads in the Kunene Region (my study area) are for 4×4’s only, leading you over large rocks, loose gravel, or deep sand. Needless to say, I’m thankful for my rented Toyota Hilux and its high clearance while navigating through these challenges in the world’s oldest desert.

Update on the Bats

My fieldwork the past week has proven to be quite successful. I am quickly becoming familiar with —> Read More Here

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