Bears, Biking, and Building Community in the Adirondacks

Sunset on the nature trail at Long Lake, N.Y.  Photo by © Katie Dolan.

By Katie Dolan

[Note: This is the third and final blog about Cycle Adirondacks, which ran from August 23-29.]

The final three days of Cycle Adirondacks brought bears, Blue Mountain Lake, lessons in building community, and beautiful scenery both on and off our bikes.

Sunset on the nature trail at Long Lake, N.Y. Photo by © Katie Dolan.

Residents from the towns along our route welcomed riders with big bear hugs, and taught us something special about the wildlife there. Long Lake, N.Y. sponsored a “decorate the bear contest” with amazing entries. The town’s enthusiastic volunteers, dressed in t-shirts with bears emblazoned on them, thanked us for visiting as we rode out of town. The Adirondack Museum – a welcome respite in the middle of a steep uphill – displayed guide boats and beaver skins. At the Wild Center‘s new elevated nature walk, we discovered that spider webs are slightly electromagnetic and bend towards insects to pull them into the silk trap. We also met Oliver the barred owl.

A bird soars over the Adirondack Museum’s Lakeview Café. Photo by © Katie Dolan.

My siblings and I spent many childhood summers at Blue Mountain Lake in Hamilton County, N.Y., so we were particularly thrilled that the Cycle Adirondacks route passed through this tiny hamlet. After four decades, the serene blue mountain looming over the lake’s tree-lined rocky islands and the ancient marina perched on a steep hill appeared unchanged and unspoiled. A group rented a pontoon boat and persuaded Zoe Smith, Director of WCS’s Adirondacks Program and Jerry, the marina’s dog, to join us in exploring the lake.

Zoe Smith, Director of WCS's Adirondacks Program and Jerry.  Photo by © Katie Dolan.
Zoe Smith, Director of WCS’s Adirondacks Program and Jerry. Photo by —> Read More

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