Behind the Photo: Seeing Double

Photo by Jodi Cobb
During a project in search of twins to photograph, Jodi Cobb stumbled on this spooky pair in a setting not soon to be forgotten. (Photograph by Jodi Cobb)

When looking at National Geographic photographer Jodi Cobb’s eerie photo of adult twins in a spooky setting, you expect to hear the duet whisper, “Come play with us.”

Cobb, who is known for breaking societal barriers to cover beauty around the world, discussed her photo and the sometimes unsettling nature of seeing double.

“I try to put a human face on complex and dry science stories to bring them to life. For a story on the science of epigenetics, I photographed twins. Twins are spooky—they unnerve us because they challenge our sense of uniqueness. I wanted to get inside their lives to see how they live and work together, so I spent a day or two with each set and tried to become a fly on the wall. Camille and Kennerly, pictured here, are making a career of their twinship as actors. Even when they’re not acting in movies like Creeporia, a comedy-horror film, the two prefer to dress alike,” Cobb said.

Throughout her career, Cobb has immersed herself in some of the most remote communities around the world to capture the beauty and complexities of being human, from everyday life to culture and ceremony.

As a photojournalism student in the 1960s Cobb avidly recorded the counter-culture she was immersed in, starting with some of rock-and-roll’s biggest names—Bruce Springsteen and Grace Slick among them. Her first documentary project covering a commune in the Ozark hills garnered numerous awards, establishing her as a new young star of the photographic world.

In the mid-1970s, Cobb left newspapers to become the first female photographer for National Geographic magazine, which was then very much a boys’ club. She would go on —> Read More