Celebrating the Rich Biodiversity of Baja in Pictures

Gulf of California, Mexico — From January 2 to January 9, 2016 the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration (CRE) traveled the Sea of Cortez aboard the National Geographic Sea Bird Lindblad ship. The CRE, consisting of leading scientists representing a variety of disciplines, were joined by explorers funded by National Geographic and other experts working in the Baja region, for a field inspection of their work.

The experience was one-of-a-kind. We heard about the discovery of new plant species and newly protected marine areas. The explorers presented on their research and field work and their mission to help the world better understand and protect sharks, blue whales, humpback whales, sea birds and vaquita. Then we saw many of these species in the wild!

The field inspection provided a sense of awe for this region and an urgency to do more to support the excellent work being done in Baja and the Sea of Cortez.

A snapshot of the rich biodiversity of this region is shared in the gallery that follows.

Dr. Bill Gilly and Susan Shillinglaw lead a tidepooling excursion to a site which John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts visited during their voyage through the Sea of Cortez in 1940. Photograph by Jen Shook.
Dr. Bill Gilly and Susan Shillinglaw lead a tidepooling excursion to a site which John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts visited during their voyage through the Sea of Cortez in 1940. Photograph by Jen Shook.
A black brittle starfish found while tidepooling at a site John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts visited during their voyage through the Sea of Cortez. Photograph by Jen Shook.
<img src="http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/files/2016/01/2.-Bill-Gilly-and-Squid-600×450.jpg" alt="Dr. Bill Gilly holds a dead cephalapod that he found beached on the rocky shore. After inspecting it under the ship's microscope, he believed it to —> Read More

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