Ceres Bright Spots Keep Their Secret Even From 2,700 miles Up

The brightest spots on dwarf planet Ceres are seen in this image taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on June 6, 2015. This is among the first snapshots from Dawn's second mapping orbit, which is 2,700 miles (4,400 kilometers) in altitude. The resolution is 1,400 feet (410 meters) per pixel. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

The brightest spots on dwarf planet Ceres are seen in this image taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft on June 6, 2015. This is among the first snapshots from Dawn’s second mapping orbit, which is 2,700 miles (4,400 km) in altitude. The resolution is 1,400 feet (410 meters) per pixel. Click photos for full resolution images. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Don’t get me wrong. I love this new photo. Dawn snapped it from its second mapping orbit from 2,700 miles up on June 6. The number of craters and the detail visible in the parallel troughs snaking through the scene are breathtaking. That’s why I hate to niggle about the white spots.

While they appear larger and sharper than images taken in May from a greater distance, they’re too bright to show much new detail. I can’t help but wonder if mission scientists might adjust the exposure a bit the next time around.(…)
Read the rest of Ceres Bright Spots Keep Their Secret Even From 2,700 miles Up (327 words)


© Bob King for Universe Today, 2015. |
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