Conservationists Playing with Fire

Today, many agricultural communities that lack access to machinery and chemical inputs depend upon fire to clear and maintain the fertility of agricultural lands and to delimit property boundaries.  Photo ©WCS Latin America & Caribbean Program

By Julie Kunen

[Dr. Julie Kunen, Executive Director of the WCS Latin America and Caribbean Program, is attending the 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia. She participated in a discussion at the Congress on the role of fire in land management.]

Sydney, Australia

For millennia, tropical civilizations cultivated their crops through a practice known as slash-and-burn agriculture. In this practice, vegetation is cut down and burned to clear land and improve the soil with the resulting organic matter and nutrients. Fire also kills or drives away pests and encourages the regeneration of grasses in natural pastures.

When used over extensive areas in a cycle of planted and fallowed fields, the practice is sustainable. Today, many agricultural communities that lack access to machinery and chemical inputs depend upon fire for their livelihoods, using it to clear and maintain the fertility of agricultural lands and to delimit property boundaries.

Today, many agricultural communities that lack access to machinery and chemical inputs depend upon fire to clear and maintain the fertility of agricultural lands and to delimit property boundaries. Photo ©WCS Latin America & Caribbean Program

Yet, fire is also a great danger to humans and there are many risks associated with the use of fire —> Read More Here

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