Converting “Dumb” Luck to Fortune

A traditional pōwhiri ceremony to welcome the crewmembers of Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia. The Maori welcomed their guests with performances, speeches, singing and an aggressive challenge to guests using ceremonial weapons. Photo by Keoni Lee.

By Evan Rapoport

Just ahead of us stood dozens of large Maori who pounded their bare chests, summoning blood until their skin glowed red. The cold gray skies and brisk ocean winds made our situation feel more grave. The whites of the angry men’s eyes doubled in size as they bulged. Tongues shot down to their chins. Weapons flashed with blinding speed as everyone jumped in unison. Powerful screams hit us with the force of a hurricane. We were fortunate that this “haka,” a traditional Maori war cry, was not to precede a battle, but to welcome us as friends and respected voyagers.

A traditional pōwhiri ceremony welcomed the crewmembers of Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia. The Maori welcomed their guests with performances, speeches, singing and an aggressive challenge to guests using ceremonial weapons. Photo by Keoni Lee.

Life is full of chance events. Sometimes they even determine our future more than our own careful planning. We call this “luck.” If something happens completely outside of your control, then we call that subset “dumb luck.”

But when you convert dumb luck into something valuable, you’re demonstrating a skill, and that takes practice. When you position yourself so that “lucky” things seem to happen around you —> Read More Here

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