Distant Stellar Nurseries: This Time, in High Definition

The Milky Way glitters above the ALMA array in this image taken from a time lapse sequence during the ESO Ultra HD Expedition.

The Milky Way (here over the ALMA telescope array in Chile): Pretty, but not particularly productive, as galaxies go. Credit: ESO/B. Tafreshi (twanight.org)

This article is a guest post by Anna Ho, who is currently doing research on stars in the Milky Way through a one-year Fulbright Scholarship at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) in Heidelberg, Germany.

In the Milky Way, an average of seven new stars is born every year. In the distant galaxy GN20, an astonishing average of 1,850 new stars is born every year. “How,” you might ask, indignant on behalf of our galactic home, “does GN20 manage 1,850 new stars in the time it takes the Milky Way to pull off one?”

To answer this, we would ideally take a detailed look at the stellar nurseries in GN20, and a detailed look at the stellar nurseries in the Milky Way, and see what makes the former so much more productive than the latter.

But GN20 is simply too far away for a detailed look. (…)
Read the rest of Distant Stellar Nurseries: This Time, in High Definition (1,086 words)


© nancy for Universe Today, 2015. |
Permalink |
No comment |

Post tags: , , , , , , , ,

Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh

—> Read More

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail