Eat The Enemy: The Delicious Solution To Menacing Asian Carp

asian carp invasive

This story is part of “Eat The Enemy,” a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table.

Wichita Eagle via Getty Images

Asian carp were never supposed to live in North American waterways. Like many other invasive species, they were introduced by humans in an attempt to address another problem, namely to remove algae from catfish farms and wastewater treatment ponds in the 1970s. But sometime in the next two decades, the fish escaped their enclosures — most likely due to several large floods in the ’90s — and began to spread.

Over the past 15 years, populations have exploded, as the carp outcompete native fish populations and quickly reproduce through the tributaries of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers while moving north to the Great Lakes. And they’ve become a huge problem.

The name “Asian carp” is actually an umbrella title for four different species: bighead carp, black carp, grass carp and silver carp. Some of the larger species can weigh up to 100 pounds and have an uncanny ability to jump out of the water. Females can produce upwards of —> Read More Here


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