February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots and Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

Although it's considered a recent human problem, it's likely that the first human to acquire the HIV virus did so over a century ago in Cameroon while butchering an infected chimpanzee. (photo by Michael Nichols/National Geographic)
Although it’s considered a recent human problem, it’s likely that the first human to acquire the HIV virus did so over a century ago in Cameroon while butchering an infected chimpanzee. (photo by Michael Nichols/National Geographic)

HOUR 1

Mattias Klum, a National Geographic photographer who has ventured to some of the world’s most pristine areas is concerned by what he sees. But he tells Boyd that for every challenge, there is an equal amount of opportunity. And his new book, The Human Quest, explores the opportunities that the planet offers within the boundaries of her resources. Klum also tells of his love for Borneo and the incredible lengths he has gone to in the past in order to get the stunning images that he does.

Sarah Marquis has spent her life walking. From Canada to Mexico, from Siberia to the far side of Australia. She says that three miles per hour is the perfect speed and that humans were made to walk. But humans weren’t necessarily made to live alone in the Australia’s rugged Kimberly Region alone, surviving on grubs, found water, and her knowledge of local plants. Marquis, who has spent the last 23 —> Read More Here

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *