February 8, 2015: Photographing “Snottites,” Dodging Humpbacks With Feeding Orcas, and More

"These Snottites are a biofilm of single-celled extremophilic bacteria which hangs down from the walls and ceilings of Cueva de Villa Luz. They are imilar to small stalactites, but have the consistency of snot. Each drop on the end of the Snottite is pure sulphuric acid" (Photo by Robbie Shone/shonephotography.com)
“These Snottites are a biofilm of single-celled extremophilic bacteria which hangs down from the walls and ceilings of Cueva de Villa Luz. They are imilar to small stalactites, but have the consistency of snot. Each drop on the end of the Snottite is pure sulphuric acid.” (Photo by Robbie Shone/shonephotography.com)

HOUR 1

– Orcas, or “killer whales,” are the apex predators of the seas. But on a recent expedition, National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen ended up feeling sorry for the 6 ton sea mammals while they were being used as waiters by a population of humpback whales off the coast of Norway. Nicklen explains that the orcas would gather fish into a tight bait ball, only to have a humpback charge through and steal the orcas’ dinner. Nicklen also had a close encounter with the inside of a humpback’s mouth that led him to ponder just how he would die. Nicklen also tells about a recent work trip to Hawaii where the photographer gained access to the notoriously tough local Hawaiian surfer scene. His photos are featured in the February 2015 issue of National Geographic magazine.

– Dodging dangling “snottites” is a hazard that sounds as —> Read More Here

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