Hōkūleʻa: Honoring the Kermadec Islands

Hōkūle'a sailing by Rangitahua / Raoul Island. (Courtesy of the Polynesian Voyaging Society)
Hōkūle’a sailing by Rangitahua/Raoul Island. (Photo courtesy Polynesian Voyaging Society)

Last week, the Worldwide Voyage set sail from Nuku’alofa in the Kingdom of Tonga after days of community connection and shared learning. The next stop on this 47,000-mile journey will be Aotearoa, or New Zealand, which will serve as a crucial port along the way for historical, cultural, ancestral, and educational reasons. In order to navigate the course to Aotearoa using traditional wayfinding methods, the crews aboard Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia are relying on the Kermadec Islands—a special group of 15 islands that serve not only as a navigational waypoint, but a cultural and conservational one as well.

The view into Denham Bay, Raoul Island, one of the few beaches for landing on the island. (Photo by Gareth Rapley)
The view into Denham Bay, Raoul Island, one of the few beaches for landing on the island. (Photo by Gareth Rapley)
The view down Oneraki Beach, Raoul Island, looking towards Meyer Island in the distance. (Photo by Gareth Rapley)

A Waypoint for All

This particular leg of the voyage, starting from Samoa and ending in Aotearoa, is deeply significant because it follows the path of ancient Polynesian voyagers along the —> Read More Here

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