Hōkūle’a: Return to Aotearoa

A Maori woman holding a flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand waves to the two canoes in Waitangi. (Photo by Daniel Lin)

After almost six months since departing from Hawai‘i, Hōkūle’a and Hikianalia arrived in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to a Maori welcoming ceremony that was not only stunning to see, but historical as well.

A Maori woman holding a flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand waves to the two canoes in Waitangi. (Photo by Daniel Lin)

When the crews of the voyaging canoes first sighted the northern coast of Aotearoa, they were elated that they were able to make it to their destinations safely using only traditional methods of non-instrument navigation. They were also excited to reach the southern point in the Polynesian Triangle (with Hawai’i to the north and Easter Island to the east), a feat that has only been accomplished a handful of times on traditional voyaging canoes since the times when ancient Polynesians used to sail extensively throughout the region.

The welcoming party from Hawai'i, consisting of voyaging elders, crewmembers, and students from Kamehameha Schools. (Photo by Daniel Lin)
The welcoming party from Hawai’i, consisting of voyaging elders, crewmembers, and students from Kamehameha Schools. (Photo by Daniel Lin)
(Photo by Daniel Lin)
Men of Waitangi and Ngā Toki Matawhaorua, an 80-person paddling —> Read More Here

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