How Tech Is Pulling Ahead Of Politics In The Fight For Our Future

The future has yet to be decided — and there’s no reason to sit around and wait for bureaucrats to make all the necessary choices.

World leaders have converged in Paris for COP21, a conference on climate change that will, for the first time, work toward “a legally binding and universal agreement” to curtail the threat of global warming. With any luck, the 25,000 delegates from governments and agencies around the world will arrive at an accord that could mean better days are ahead for our planet.

Meanwhile, technology companies and entrepreneurs have already plowed forward, enabling substantial change that isn’t tethered to a slow political process.

These advances come in many shapes and sizes. They’re big and small, physical and data-driven, as simple as installing rooftop solar panels or as complex as applying algorithms to analyze and reduce energy consumption. And they’re only going to become a bigger part of the status quo.

The swords that cut this Gordian Knot: breakthrough technologies built and deployed by entrepreneurial companies with global scope.
Reid Hoffman, LinkedIn founder

This week, some of the most important tech and business leaders in the world — think Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Marc Benioff — launched the Breakthrough Energy Coalition, which aims to develop zero-carbon energy technology and make it profitable.

“Producing large-scale, reliable, affordable, and carbon-free energy is one of these key global problems. The swords that cut this Gordian Knot: breakthrough technologies built and deployed by entrepreneurial companies with global scope,” LinkedIn founder and coalition member Reid Hoffman said in a statement.

Along those lines, Apple announced in October that, thanks to solar construction, all of its operations in China are carbon-neutral. And IBM’s supercomputer Watson will soon be able to provide <a target="_blank" —> Read More

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