How to Find Rosetta’s Comet In Your Telescope

This sequence of images, taken with Rosetta's OSIRIS narrow-angle camera on 30 July 2015, show a boulder-sized object close to the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The images were captured on 30 July 2015, about 185 km from the comet. The object measures between one and 50 m across; however, the exact size cannot be determined as it depends on its distance to the spacecraft, which cannot be inferred from these images. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

While you won’t see it this close, Comet 67P/C-G is now at its best in the morning sky. This sequence of images, taken with Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera from 115 miles (185 km) away on July 30, 2015, show a boulder-sized object close to the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The object measures anywhere between 3 – 165 feet across (1- 50 meters) across. The exact size can’t be determined as it depends on its distance to the spacecraft, which can’t be inferred from the photos. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

How would you like to see one of the most famous comets with your own eyes? Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko plies the morning sky, a little blot of fuzzy light toting an amazing visitor along for the ride — the Rosetta spacecraft. When you look at the coma and realize a human-made machine is buzzing around inside, it seems unbelievable. Wonderful, really.(…)
Read the rest of How to Find Rosetta’s Comet In Your Telescope (836 words)


© Bob King for Universe Today, 2015. |
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