January 18, 2015: Backyard Photography Tips and Antarctic Volcano Hunting

Photographer Joe Petersburger explains how to get a picture in the pages of National Geographic magazine: know something about the animals you're photographing; get lucky. (photo by Joe Petersburger)
Photographer Joe Petersburger explains how to get a picture in the pages of National Geographic magazine: know something about the animals you’re photographing; get lucky. (photo by Joe Petersburger)

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend.

You can listen to a growing archive of our interviews on SoundCloud as well!

HOUR 1

– Riding kayaks off waterfalls is like graduating from school. As professional kayaker and filmmaker Trip Jennings tells it, your first real waterfall is ten feet high. Then progressively, a kayaker will practice riding larger falls until they will hit a 30 foot waterfall. Jennings explains that after “30 feet, things behave pretty similarly. The technique is the same, it just takes longer before you hit the bottom.” But Jennings explains that each waterfall behaves differently based on the volume of water going over the fall’s edge, because kayakers need the water to break the landing pool’s surface tension, rather than landing in flat water, which could cause a serious injury. Jennings shares more kayaking rules in this segment.

– An image —> Read More Here

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *