Low Vaccination Rates Set The Stage For Disneyland Measles Outbreak

By Lisa Rapaport
(Reuters Health) – The rapid spread of a measles outbreak from Disneyland in California to communities around the country suggests that vaccination rates in some places may be as low as 50 percent, a study suggests.
“Disneyland is an international attraction and sometimes people are coming from places where measles vaccination rates are low or they don’t get the recommended two doses, and that, combined with the fact that there are a lot of pockets of non-vaccination in California and people coming from all over the U.S. created the perfect storm for a big outbreak,” lead author Maimuna Majumder of Boston Children’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told Reuters Health.
This year, the U.S. is experiencing a multi-state measles outbreak believed to have started at Disneyland this past December, as well as three other unrelated outbreaks in Illinois, Nevada, and Washington, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As of March 6, 173 people from 17 states and the District of Columbia were reported to have measles, with most linked back to Disneyland.
Measles is a highly contagious virus that can be serious or even fatal. It starts with a fever that can last a couple of days, followed by a cough, runny nose, and pink eye. A rash develops on the face and —> Read More