March 1, 2015: Photographing a Revolution, Collecting Subway Bacteria and More

An Egyptian protester reacts as others prepare to throw stones at government forces during clashes that erupted after a pro-democracy sit-in was forcefully broken up by government troops in Cairo December 16, 2011. by Matt Moyer
An Egyptian protester reacts as others prepare to throw stones at government forces during clashes that erupted after a pro-democracy sit-in was forcefully broken up by government troops in Cairo December 16, 2011. by Matt Moyer

HOUR 1

– The United States has been mapped, graphed and generally analyzed in every way imaginable. But on deep in Alaska’s interior, the exact height of several peaks in the Brooks Range remain a mystery. Glaciologist Matt Nolan hopes to estimate rates of glacier change in the range, so to establish a baselline measurement, ski mountaineers Kit Deslauriers and Andy Bardon carried a GPS sensor to the summit of two peaks in the range. Nolan hasn’t revealed the findings just yet, but Deslauriers and Bardon were less secretive about their ski adventure through the “No Fall Zone.”

– New York City subways: smelly, crowded but integral to the city’s ability to move over 4 million people everyday. They’re also covered in microbes. Cornell University biophysicist Chris Mason enlisted an army of willing students to swab the city’s subway stations and gained some interesting perspective on the city’s microbiome: 48% of the DNA isn’t associated with any known bacteria; only —> Read More Here

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *