Mars Needs You! Help Scientists Track Spring Thaw On Red Planet

Carbon dioxide ice begins to feel the heat in the south pole region every spring. In this image of 'Inca City' taken in August 2014, you can see a few fans coming out from channels (araneiforms) that are created when pressurized gas escapes from the melting ice. Picture taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's HiRISE camera. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Carbon dioxide ice begins to feel the heat in the south pole region every spring. In this image of ‘Inca City’ taken in August 2014, you can see a few fans coming out from channels (araneiforms) that are created when pressurized gas escapes from the melting ice. Picture taken Aug. 6, 2014 by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s HiRISE camera. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

We’ve been watching Mars with spacecraft for about 50 years, but there’s still so little we know about the Red Planet. Take this sequence of images in this post recently taken by a powerful camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Spring arrives in the southern hemisphere and produces a bunch of mysteries, such as gray-blue streaks you can see in a picture below.

That’s where citizen scientists can come in, according to a recent post for the University of Arizona’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera that took these pictures. They’re asking people with a little spare time to sign up for Planet Four (a Zooniverse project) to look at mysterious Mars features. With amateurs and professionals working together, maybe we’ll learn more about these strange changes you see below.

(…)
Read the rest of <a target="_blank" —> Read More Here

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *