NASA Test Fires SLS Flight Engine Destined to Launch Astronauts Back to the Moon

NASA engineers conduct a successful test firing of RS-25 rocket engine No. 2059 on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The hot fire marks the first test of an RS-25 flight engine for NASA's new Space Launch System vehicle.  Credits: NASA/SSC

NASA engineers have successfully test fired the first flight engine destined to power the agency’s mammoth new SLS rocket that will launch American astronauts back to the Moon and deep space for the first time in nearly five decades. The flight proven RS-25 powerplant engine previously flew as one of three main engines that successfully rocketed NASA’s space shuttle orbiters to space during the three decade long Space Shuttle era that ended in 2011.On March 10, NASA engineers conducted a successful 500 second long test firing of RS-25 rocket engine No. 2059 on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.The hot fire marks the first test of an RS-25 flight engine for NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. It also simultaneously marks a major milestone towards implementing the agency’s vision of sending humans on future deep-space missions to destinations including the Moon, an asteroid and a ‘Journey to Mars.’“What a great moment for NASA and Stennis,” said Rick Gilbrech, director of NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, in a statement.“We have exciting days ahead with a return to deep space and a journey to Mars, and this test is a very big step in that direction.”This NASA video shows the full duration hot-fire test:https://youtu.be/njb9Z2jX2fAVideo caption: NASA engineers at Stennis Space Center tested RS-25 engine No. 2059 on the A-1 Test Stand on March 10, 2016. This was the first flight engine for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), to be tested at Stennis. Credit: NASA The SLS is the most powerful rocket the world has ever seen and will loft astronauts in the Orion capsule on missions back to the Moon by around 2021, to an asteroid around 2025 and then beyond on a —> Read More

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