Next Steps for U.S. Pirate Fishing Rules

 QR Codes on the glass seafood display at the Fish Market at BlackSalt Restaurant  in Washington, DC. Photo by Maggie Hines.
QR Codes on the glass seafood display at the Fish Market at BlackSalt Restaurant in Washington, DC. Photo by Maggie Hines.

Do you know if your seafood dinner was caught and imported legally?

Chances are good now that you wouldn’t be able to find out. But this week, a special task force of a dozen federal agencies released recommendations on how the U.S. can rein in illegal, or pirate, fishing and make seafood more traceable and sustainable.

Carol Browner, a former EPA Administrator who now serves on the Global Ocean Commission, told National Geographic that she is “impressed” by the new recommendations, which call for better monitoring and control of seafood products.

The recommendations are now in a 30-day comment period, before the president issues final rules.

“They have articulated a very comprehensive strategy,” said Browner. “If they can figure out the implementation this really positions the U.S. in a leadership role.”

We spoke with Catherine Novelli, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment about the recommendations and the next steps. Novelli was instrumental in guiding the report process.

Why is it important to fight illegal fishing and improve seafood traceability?

I think it is hugely important. Global losses attributed —> Read More Here

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