November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

New York City's rats face such strong pressures from humans constantly trying to exterminate them that they've evolved to be very savvy city dwellers. Jason Munshi-South studies how rats and mice have evolved genetically distinct populations in the Big Apple. (photo by James L. Stanfield/National Geographic)
New York City’s rats face such strong pressures from humans constantly trying to exterminate them that they’ve evolved to be very savvy city dwellers. Jason Munshi-South studies how rats and mice have evolved genetically distinct populations in the Big Apple. (photo by James L. Stanfield/National Geographic)

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend.

Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below!

HOUR 1

– The “nose” of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park is one of the world’s most iconic big wall climbing routes that was first climbed by Warren Harding in 1958. It took him 45 days. As the current record holder Hans Florine explains “A lot has happened since then.” Florine teamed up with Alex Honnold in 2012 to complete the 2,950 foot route in 2 hours 23 minutes and 46 seconds. Florine is one of the pioneers of speed climbing and has climbed El Capitan’s nose route 97 times. His love affair with the scenery and granite walls in Yosemite continues to motivate him. —> Read More Here

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