November 9, 2014: Rescue Storm Survivors from Everest, Test an Elephant’s Memory and More

Elephants are very social creatures and they have terrific memories. Nat Geo Explorer Joyce Poole explains that they can remember humans for years after meeting them and that they regularly go back to visit the places where their relatives died. (photo by Chris Johns/National Geographic)
Elephants are very social creatures and they have terrific memories. Nat Geo Explorer Joyce Poole explains that they can remember humans for years after meeting them and that they regularly go back to visit the places where their relatives died. (photo by Chris Johns/National Geographic)

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend.

Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below!

HOUR 1

– On April 18, 2014, 16 Sherpas were killed in a tragic avalanche on Mount Everest, which is the deadliest day in the mountain’s history. The previous mark for the mountain’s highest death toll in a single accident happened in 1996, when eight climbers were trapped in a snowstorm and died. Climber and filmmaker David Brashears was on the mountain that day. He helped shepherd frostbitten and disoriented survivors high off the mountain in the storm’s aftermath. Knowing that it would end his pursuit of the summit, and put the film in jeopard, Brashears gave much of his bottled oxygen to the effort to rescue —> Read More Here

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