Put Advocates in Charge of the Breast Cancer Research Agenda

Across the country, people run, walk, dine out, buy “stuff” and write checks to support breast cancer research. All of this is great. But what exactly is “breast cancer research?” Where does the money go? Who decides which questions are asked? How do we measure success? All of these are incredibly important questions. If we really want to end breast cancer and save lives, it will take more than just raising and spending more money on research. We need a thoughtful, strategic approach to making certain that money is well spent. We need to know that the end result benefits women and men at risk of and with breast cancer, rather than just supporting institutions, individual scientists and drug companies.

At the National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC), we know that advocates trained in the science of breast cancer, women and men who are outside the system of science and research, should lead the way. That might sound strange–lay advocates setting a scientific research agenda? We have proven it works. Educated advocates like the ones at NBCC are the only ones with no agenda other than to end breast cancer. Not get published, or promoted or make a profit. Just save lives.

Try to look up how many institutions around the country are working on breast cancer research. Or how many thousands of scientists are doing that work. You can’t do it. Nor can we easily find out what they are doing in breast cancer. There is little transparency in breast cancer research, beyond piecing together federal funding and what information you can find on private grants and associations. The federal government appropriated more than $800 million last year for breast cancer research. It is estimated that private philanthropy exceeds hundreds of millions of dollars —> Read More