Swamp Stomping and the Value of Trails

Mallory Dimmitt and joe Guthrie wade through the Bradwell Bay Wilderness Area in Apalachicola National Forest, following the orange blazes of the Florida National Scenic Trail.  Photo by Carlton Ward Jr / CarltonWard.com
Mallory Dimmitt and Joe Guthrie wade through the Bradwell Bay Wilderness Area in Apalachicola National Forest, following the orange blazes of the Florida National Scenic Trail. In this stretch, the standing water is the trail. (Photo by Carlton Ward Jr.)

“Is it a trail?” When people first learn of the Florida Wildlife Corridor and our #Glades2Gulf Expedition, this is often the question asked. I answer that the Corridor is wider than a trail; it’s a broad swath of habitat that connects even larger land areas important for wildlife, watersheds, and people.

Still, in planning our travel route through the Corridor for our 1000-mile expeditions, we find and follow existing trails where available, just as wildlife do. In our daily journeys thus far (today is Expedition Day 35 of 70—the half-way point!), we regularly see prints from bobcats, raccoons, river otters, birds, deer, feral hogs, and other species who use the same trails we’re on.

A bobcat triggers a remote trail camera while walking through the ancient scrub of the Lake Wales Ridge at Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placed, FL. The 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition traversed this same property. (Photo by Carlton Ward Jr.)

The Route So Far

So far —> Read More Here

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