The Karoo Predator Project: Mitigating the human-wildlife conflict

A tamed jackal on a farm. Even if most of the farmers hate the predator, they recognise being fascinated by its intelligence.

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world.

Photos by iLCP Fellow Denis Palanque, and Nathalie Houdin. Text by Marine Drouilly and Kai Fitchen.

A tamed jackal on a farm. Even if most of the farmers hate the predator, they recognise being fascinated by its intelligence.

At the heart of the Karoo Predator Project: helping science through photography to mitigate human-wildlife conflict

After more than a year of planning, countless discussions and an exhausting twenty-three hour flight, two intrepid photographers, Denis Palanque and Nathalie Houdin, heaved the last 60kg case full of custom made photographic equipment onto African soil. This was the initial phase of their photographic project, which would take them to a unique and dusty wilderness. A wilderness filled with unexplored mountains, canyons and century-old farms. Their aim was to report on the Karoo Predator Project, which is researching predators’ behaviour and movement ecology on South African Karoo farmlands to mitigate conflicts with farmers.

The region of the Karoo is a semi-desert with plains interspersed with mountains and —> Read More Here

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